Fancy Goldfish Varieties

There are a variety of methods to distinguish the plain as well as expensive goldfish ( Carassius auratus) by the shape of their bodies, their pigments or patterns, their kind of scales, as well as other distinct characteristics such as the morphology of their tail and head.

Goldfish are usually divided into breeds and varieties, however, these categories are very fluid and loose.

When you’re the raising of fish there’s no fish species that provides more choices in terms of patterns, colors body shape, fin configurations than the goldfish.

Did you be aware that they were among of the very first fish species that was domesticated and selectively breed? There are over 200 kinds of goldfish found around the globe!

If you’ve seen just the tank of feeder fish, or perhaps a handful of odd goldfish varieties, you could be surprised by the diversity of this species is.

Let me introduce you to this vast and fascinating fish family and assist you in identifying the most suitable species to add to your goldfish tank or pond!

types of goldfish 1

Types Of Goldfish Introduction to Hearty and Fancy Fishes

Names of fish can be an indication of what it appears like. It will help you in choosing the most suitable goldfish species for outdoor ponds or aquariums.

Certain breeds are recognized for their heartiness and sturdy, while others are fragile and require more care.

Common Name (species) Goldfish (Carassius auratus)
Family Cyprinidae
Temperament Peaceful, social and curious
Care Level Varies by breed
Diet Omnivore; Ideal diet varies by breed
Average Size 8 to 12 inches from snout to tail at maturity
Water Hardness Does well with either soft or hard water
pH Range 6.0 to 8.0
Water Current They don’t like swift water currents and these hard currents can harm the delicate fancy breeds. They prefer well-oxygenated water but can survive in stagnant conditions as long as the water is clean
Water Quality and Filtration Goldfish are very sensitive to ammonia and need very clean water to thrive. Because they are such voracious eaters they produce a lot of biowaste. 3-stage low-flow filtration with weekly water changes is ideal

Goldfish Breeds—A Detailed Guide to 32 Popular Types

It’s time for us to discuss the most well-known goldfish breeds and the differences they have in appearance and care needs.

To narrow down your options to determine the most desirable breed of goldfish is contingent on whether you’re keeping an aquarium or a pond However, from there, the possibilities are endless!

Single Tailed Goldfish Breeds

Single-tailed goldfish are healthy and easy to take care of with an indoor pond, or in a suitable size aquarium.

They aren’t in any way sensitive to temperature, but prefer clear filtering water with a low current. Single tails love exploring tanks with ornaments with plants, hide-outs and plants but they also require space to swim.

Common Goldfish aka Feeder Goldfish

Goldfish that are common don’t receive much attention on these kinds of lists however most of us begin with tank of these cheap fish!

It’s really not that more simple than keeping the common goldfish.

They can be found in a range of temperatures that are acceptable and although they don’t require heating, they are often able to do fine in tropical settings.

Do feeder fish mean the exact thing as the common goldfish? It is dependent on the retailer.

Commons aren’t always inferior feeder fish , and many shops have tanks filled with brightly colored fish to stock tanks and outdoor ponds.

The fish could be more expensive than their supply of feeders, but.

Feeders are typically small and plain brown or grey goldfish that are culled from the groups of their more vibrant and rapidly growing sibling fish.

Their hardiness is similar to the other goldfish species, however they are usually kept in tightly-packed aquarium store tanks and aren’t kept or fed as often.

Breed Common Goldfish, Feeder Goldfish
Unique Trait N/A
Care Level Easy
Ideal Diet Commercial goldfish flakes or pellets supplemented with live/frozen foods such as brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic scales
Pattern Can be any color or mix of colors other than calico, but the most common patterns are self-colored or bi-colored. Feeder tanks are often considered multicolored
Colors Grey/brown, red/orange, and white/silver are most common
Average Size 2 to 4-inches for juveniles; 10 to 12-inches at maturity, although there are many reports of these fish reaching 14 inches or longer
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 20 gallons for adult

Add 10 to 15 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds Yes
Temperature Range Coldwater 60 to 80°F
Compatibility with Tank Mates Compatible with other single tail goldfish, peaceful community fish or koi with similar care requirements. Avoid housing with aggressive fish or small snails or shrimp which might get eaten

Comet Goldfish

Comet goldfish are smaller, more leaner structure than Common breed, but they have an elongated, distinctive tail that is sharp with points.

They require a bit larger space than the Common goldfish, so that they don’t get injured on their surface or their décor.

Goldfish are energetic and attractive. They are among the most well-known varieties of goldfish!

These are coldwater fish that thrive in ponds, however, you can also keep them inside heated tanks.

Comets are typically deep-colored with a vibrant red or orange hue which is stunning in the midst of a water pond.

The majority of comet goldfish can be self – or bi-colored. They generally are available as Red and White Sarassa forms.

Breed Comet Goldfish
Unique Trait Long, flowing single tail that spreads out; the slender body is shorter than the Common
Care Level Easy
Ideal Diet Commercial goldfish flakes or pellets supplemented with live/frozen foods such as brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic scales
Pattern Usually self-colored or bi-colored. Red and White’s are the most common but this breed also comes in Sarassa morphs
Colors Red/orange, white, yellow, green or chocolate

Black Comets are not true comets but rather a hybrid koi/goldfish species

Average Size 2 to 4 inches for juveniles; 10 to 12 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 15 gallons for juvenile; 30 gallons for adult

Add 15 to 20 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds Yes
Temperature Range Coldwater 60 to 80°F
Compatibility with Tank Mates Compatible with other single tail goldfish, peaceful community fish or koi with similar care requirements. Avoid housing with aggressive fish or small snails or shrimp which might get eaten

Nymph Goldfish

There aren’t many Nymph goldfish available for sale nowadays, but these fish were very popular in the past 15 years and have since fallen out of fashion.

The hearty fish are of the top swimmers of the goldfish family. It is hilarious due to their egg-shaped bodies and lengthy single tail. There are some with telescopic eyes too.

Although they are called Nymphs, they aren’t small fish. They can grow to as long as 12 inches of length.

It’s believed they were originally an interbreeding between the Comet and the Fancy Fantail, although these times, the characteristic usually shows as a recessive characteristic when it comes to Fantail or Veiltail crosses. They’re easy to keep in a pond or an enormous aquarium.

Breed Nymph Goldfish
Unique Trait Has the egg-shaped body of a fantail with the single tail of the hearty goldfish. Thought to be a cross of a Comet and Fancy Fantail
Care Level Easy
Ideal Diet Commercial goldfish flakes or pellets supplemented with live/frozen foods such as brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic scales
Pattern Usually self-colored or bi-colored
Colors Any color except calico
Average Size 1 to 3 inches for juveniles; 10 to 12 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 20 gallons for adult

Add 10 to 15 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds Yes
Temperature Range Coldwater 60 to 80°F
Compatibility with Tank Mates Compatible with other single tail goldfish, peaceful community fish or koi with similar care requirements. Avoid housing with aggressive fish or small snails or shrimp which might get eaten

Shubunkin Goldfish

My personal favorite goldfish is the obscure Shubunkin. They can be a bit difficult for those who are new to keeping goldfish because any tail fish with a single tail with a calico color is thought to be Shubunkin.

If you are breeding with a Comet or Nymph goldfish that has the calico trait, it’s technically Shubunkin. The color morph determines the breed.

Goldfish that are fancy and have the calico-like morph could be called Shubunkins. However, some sellers still label Shubunkins as Calico.

If you spot a beautiful type of goldfish known as”Shubunkin-type “Shubunkin-type” you can be sure it’s a color that is calico. There are three varieties of Shubunkin goldfish and their distinctions aren’t always obvious.


American/Japanese Shubunkin

The American (also known as the Japanese ) kind of Shubunkin is distinguished with its tail. Its tail is longer than other varieties with sharp points and a thick fork.

Many believe that Shubunkin as the American Shubunkin or Japanese Shubunkin being the original version, and that the other forms likely derived from them.


Bristol Shubunkin

The Bristol type of Shubunkin has a slender body similar to the Comet with a distinctive, large pointed tail.


London Shubunkin

The final type of Shubunkin is the London form, which has a slender body with shorter, rounder tail fins.

Breed Shubunkin or Calico Goldfish
Unique Trait Nacreous scales with calico color morph; body and tail shape determines the specific type of Shubunkin (American, Bristol or London)
Care Level Easy
Ideal Diet Commercial goldfish flakes or pellets supplemented with live/frozen foods such as brine shrimp
Scale Type Nacreous
Pattern Calico
Colors Base color is usually blue with white, black or red/orange patches or speckles. Scales can bring out iridescent blue/purple hues in some lighting conditions. Black is usually a stable color in calico goldfish
Average Size 2 to 4 inches for juveniles; 10 to 12 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 20 gallons for adult

Add 10 to 15 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds Yes
Temperature Range Coldwater 60 to 80°F
Compatibility with Tank Mates Compatible with other single tail goldfish, peaceful community fish or koi with similar care requirements. Avoid housing with aggressive fish or small snails or shrimp which might get eaten

Tamasaba or Sabao Goldfish

This unique Japanese goldfish isn’t frequently seen, however it is very rare. Tamasaba is a vividly colored red or white goldfish with an egg-shaped body , and an extremely long tail. Their tail is believed to resemble that of a mackerel’s tail.

They were initially bred from Ryukin breeders and you can clearly notice the distinct hump they’ve taken from their grandparents.

These slender fish are great choices for koi ponds and add an attractive look in comparison to the slimmer koi.

They can be found in large aquariums, but should not be kept in conjunction with other kinds that have single tails. They’re quite difficult to locate nowadays and there’s not much information on them online.

Breed Tamasaba, Sabao or Mackerel Tailed Goldfish
Unique Trait Round egg-shaped body with an arched back and long single tail with rounded points
Care Level Easy to Moderate
Ideal Diet Commercial goldfish flakes or pellets supplemented with live/frozen foods such as brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic
Pattern Self-colored or bi-colored
Colors Usually red/orange or Red and White
Average Size 1 to 2 inches for juveniles; 8 to 10 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 20 gallons for adult

Add 10 to 15 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds Yes
Temperature Range Coldwater 60 to 80°F
Compatibility with Tank Mates Best kept with other Tamasaba goldfish or with koi rather than other breeds of single tail goldfish. Avoid housing with aggressive fish or small snails or shrimp which might get eaten

Double Tail Goldfish—Fancy Breeds

Double tail goldfish are usually fancy varieties of fish that have a circular egg-shaped, hunched or egg-shaped bodies.

They tend to be more sensitive to environment and generally (but often) require warmer tanks that can maintain a steady temperature. They don’t swim as quickly and are generally not suited to the pond environment.

You may keep various kinds of fancy goldfish in the same tank as provided they have enough space, but do not keep them with single tails.

The more fancies with slower paces cannot compete with them in food. Mix fancies on the basis of their physical traits , and ensure that the gentle breeds are apart from the larger ones such as Fantails.

Certain breeds of dogs possess physical characteristics that make them more susceptible to injury from accidents for example, those with Celestial as well as Bubble Eyes.

It’s possible that you’ll need to modify your decor or equipment in order to protect your fish from injury. It is essential to have an aquarium heater and a low-flow filters for the delicate fish tank.


Fantail Goldfish

If you’re ready to plunge in the realm of goldfish that is fancy,, you could not pick a better starting species than Fantail!

Although these fish require more specific conditions than single tails, they are nevertheless among the easiest goldfish to take care of.

Fantails come with egg-shaped bodies as well as beautiful double tails with long, long lengths that are the reason they’re called.

Fantails are the breed of choice for the majority of fancy goldfish . They are often crossed back to these lines to keep them healthy genetically.

They prefer warm water over goldfish that are savvier and typically will require an heater for their aquariums.

Their tails make them awkward swimmers , but they do not require any particular care to be successful.

Breed Fantail or Fancy Fantail Goldfish
Unique Trait Egg-shaped body with a long double tail; fish with extra-long tails may also be termed “Ribbon-tailed Fantail”
Care Level Easy to Moderate
Ideal Diet Commercial goldfish pellets are best, although strong swimmers may be able to catch flake foods. Supplement with live/frozen foods such as brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic is most common but may come in nacreous or matte forms
Pattern Self-colored or bi-colored; Red and White most common but calico morphs are not unusual
Colors Usually red/orange or yellow. Black, white, and koi-colored morphs are often available in Japan
Average Size 1 to 2 inches for juveniles; 6 to 8 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 15 to 20 gallons for adult

Add 10 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds No
Temperature Range 70 to 80°F;  Technically not a tropical fish but does better in warmer conditions
Compatibility with Tank Mates Best housed with similar breeds of Fancy goldfish with the same care requirements, like the Ryukin. Avoid keeping in community aquariums or with single tail hearty goldfish breeds

Veiltail Goldfish

If you love the appearance of the Fantail but are looking to a challenge, then think about the stunning Veiltail goldfish.

They have a more rounded and slightly smaller body, but what makes them stand out is their flowing, 4-inch length tail as well as dorsal fin.

The Veiltails look the best Betta among all the goldfish that sport their beautiful fins!

Veiltails can be difficult to maintain due to the fact that fins are unable to move and are easily damaged and ruined on the décor.

They don’t have the ability to find food scraps well and should be fed with a diet that they can easily capture.

They require plenty of space to move around the tank , and are not suitable for aquariums that are used in community settings.

Breed Veiltail Goldfish
Unique Trait Compact round body with a long, flowing dorsal fin and elongated, well-separated 3 to 4-inch double tail
Care Level Moderate to Hard
Ideal Diet Commercial goldfish pellets that float are best since these fish can’t swim very well. Supplement with live/frozen foods such as brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic is most desirable but may come in nacreous or matte forms
Pattern Self-colored or bi-colored are most common but may also come in calico morph
Colors Usually red/orange or Red and White
Average Size 1 to 2 inches for juveniles; 7 to 8 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 15 to 20 gallons for adult

Add 10 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds No
Temperature Range 70 to 80°F
Compatibility with Tank Mates Best housed with similar breeds of Fancy goldfish with the same care requirements, like the Bubble Eye or Celestial. Avoid keeping in community aquariums or with heartier goldfish breeds

Butterfly Tail Goldfish

Another showy breed , known for their fins that sparkle The Butterfly Tail goldfish were bred to be viewed from a distance.

They sport a hunched Ryukin-style body and an extended, wide-spread tail that appears to be an insect when you look at them.

Butterflies can also have other attractive characteristics like telescopic eyelids or hoods.

Goldfish are now sought-after by breeders and are available in a myriad of scales designs, patterns, and colors.

Recently, styles like self-colored white mattes, blue and lavender have been made more readily available and there are more to follow!

Breed Butterfly Tail Goldfish
Unique Trait Round, hunched body with an elongated widely-spread double tail. Observed from overhead the tail resembles a butterfly. Often comes with telescopic eyes as in the Butterfly Moor morph or with other fancy traits
Care Level Moderate to Hard
Ideal Diet Commercial goldfish pellets that float are best since these fish can’t swim very well. Supplement with live/frozen foods such as brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic is desirable and the most common, but may come in nacreous or matte forms
Pattern Self-colored or bi-colored are most common but may come in  tri-colored and calico morphs
Colors Panda is most desirable but Red and Black/Red and White morphs are also popular. Self-colored black is rarely stable and usually morphs to a Panda/Red Panda
Average Size 1 to 2 inches for juveniles; 7 to 8 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 15 to 20 gallons for adult

Add 10 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds No
Temperature Range 70 to 80°F
Compatibility with Tank Mates Best housed with similar breeds of Fancy goldfish with the same care requirements, like the Bubble Eye or Celestial. Avoid keeping in community aquariums or with heartier goldfish breeds

Wakin Goldfish

A rare fancy species that is a great choice for aquariums and ponds. The Wakin appears to be an intermixture of Common and a Comet goldfish that has an Fancy Fantail.

They have a sleeker, slimmer body, a straight dorsal fin that extends almost all the way to it’s back. They also have a gorgeous double tail that is a little smaller than the Fantail.

These powerful swimmers can be easy to maintain and don’t require any particular requirements, other than having enough space for them to grow to their full size.

A couple of the water-raised Wakins have grown to nearly 19 inches in length! There’s a range of patterns and colors to pick from.


Watonai Goldfish (Wakin Hybrid)

Instead of discussing the two separately, I’m adding the Watonai in the Wakin as they’re closely related and share the same needs.

The Watonai is the same shape and coloration like the Wakin however it has a larger double tail. They are among the most beautiful breeds that flourish on ponds, and are easy to take care of!

Breeds Wakin Goldfish and Watonai Goldfish (Watonai hybrid)
Unique Trait Leaner hearty-goldfish shaped body with an upright dorsal fin that extends down its spine and classic double tail.

The Watonai hybrid has a longer double tail, but care requirements are the same

Care Level Easy to Moderate
Ideal Diet Commercial goldfish flakes or pellets supplemented with live/frozen foods such as brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic is the most common, but may come in nacreous
Pattern Traditionally self-colored or bi-colored, but recently available in calico morph
Colors Red or Red and White are the most desirable but also comes in calico, chocolate, and yellow/orange morphs
Average Size 2 to 4 inches for juveniles; 10 to 12 inches in length at maturity, but there are reports of these fish reaching nearly 19-inches in pond settings
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 30 gallons for adult

Add 15 to 20 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds Yes
Temperature Range Coldwater 60 to 78°F; often does well without a heater
Compatibility with Tank Mates Does well in aquariums or ponds with Common, Comet or Shubunkin goldfish

Ryukin Goldfish

Another of my most loved goldfish breeds is Ryukin is another of my favorites. Ryukin is a descendent of the Fantail and is the basis for several other breeds, including those of Watonai or Butterfly.

They have a distinct bulge in their backs that make them twice as tall as the length of their bodies. They have a traditional double tail and are among of the most enjoyable fish to keep.

As with the other fancy goldfish Ryukin thrives in ponds so long that their preferred temperature is kept by the aid of a heater.

They can be kept in an aquarium together with other goldfish. This is a great alternative if you’re searching for small goldfish varieties!

Breed Ryukin Goldfish
Unique Trait Round body with prominently humped back and classic double tail. Longer tailed fish may be called ribbon or fringe tailed
Care Level Easy to Moderate
Ideal Diet Commercial goldfish flakes or pellets supplemented with live/frozen foods such as brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic is the most common, but nacreous morph is available
Pattern Self-colored, bi-colored, tri-colored or calico
Colors Red, Red and White, calico, chocolate and white are the most common morphs
Average Size 2 to 4 inches for juveniles; 6 to 10 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 20 to 30 gallons for adult

Add 10 to 15 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds Yes
Temperature Range 65 to 78°F; best to maintain temperature with a heater
Compatibility with Tank Mates Does well in aquariums or ponds with Common, Comet or Shubunkin goldfish, or housed in an aquarium with other fancy Fantail, Lionheads or Orandas

Jikin or Peacock Goldfish

Another breed is often referred to as the Butterfly as well as a Peacock goldfish the Jikin is a unique color morph that originates from Japan.

They generally have a long body, similar to that of the Common (though certain breeds are hunched Ryukin characteristic) with a long, spread tail that is best seen from the top.

The place where the Jikin truly stands out is because of its distinctive color pattern.

The ideal colour scheme should always be bicolored Red and White, however one of the best reds color is on the tail fins, fins and the gill covers, and the lips.

Red on any other part of the body that is not the “12-points” is not acceptable and should be is ruled out.

Breed Jikin Goldfish, Butterfly or Peacock Goldfish
Unique Trait Body is usually leaner and more streamlined than most fancies with a long, wide-spread double tail. Color is what distinguishes this from other fancy breeds
Care Level Easy to Moderate
Ideal Diet Commercial goldfish flakes or pellets supplemented with live/frozen foods such as brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic. The nacreous form is a separate breed (Edojikin)
Pattern Bi-colored Red and White is the only desirable morph
Colors Strong preference for fish white bodies and heads that have a deep red color on the “12-points” of the fins, gill covers and lips
Average Size 2 to 4 inches for juveniles; 8 to 10 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 20 to 30 gallons for adult

Add 10 to 15 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds Yes
Temperature Range 65 to 78°F; best to maintain temperature with a heater
Compatibility with Tank Mates Does well in aquariums or ponds with Common, Comet or Shubunkin goldfish, or housed in an aquarium with other fancy Fantail, Lionheads or Orandas

Tosakin Goldfish

If not for the dedication of a goldfish fan known as Hiroe Tamura the breed could be extinct.

Following tsunamis, earthquakes as well as World War II decimated the region of Japan in which they were breed Ms. Tamura risked his life to save six marine fishes from Kochi Prefecture and re-establish the breed.

The rare goldfish is nearly never seen out of Japan. Tosakin Tosakin is akin to a hunched back Ryukin however it has a stunning broad-spread double tail which is connected instead of separate.

From the above, their tails are spread over their backs as if they were flowing skirts.

Breed Tosakin Goldfish, Peacock Tail, Curly Tail
Unique Trait Ryukin-style hunched back, compact body with long, widespread attached double tail best viewed from above
Care Level Hard
Ideal Diet Best fed a diet of commercial goldfish pellets that float since these fish don’t swim well, supplemented with live/frozen foods such as bloodworms
Scale Type Metallic is more common but nacreous fish have recently appeared
Pattern Self-colored and bi-colored
Colors Red, black or Red and White. Calico is a much rarer morph
Average Size 1 to 2 inches for juveniles; 4 to 8 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 20 gallons long for adult; this breed does best in shallow water no deeper than 10-inches

Add 10 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds No
Temperature Range 65 to 78°F; best to maintain temperature with a heater
Compatibility with Tank Mates Should only be housed with other Tosakins

Ranchu

The stunning Ranchu is one of the most ancient breeds and is referred to for being”the “King of the Goldfish” in Japan because they are highly prized.

It’s easy for people to mistake the fish for Lionheads that they closely seem to resemble.

The Ranchu features a less-prominent front hood, and a more spacious back.

The Ranchu doesn’t have dorsal fins, which means they’re not very good at maneuvering through the water or searching for food.

These delicate goldfish do best in a temperature-stabilized aquarium with similar types of goldfish.

Breed Ranchu Goldfish, King of the Goldfish, Buffalo Head Goldfish
Unique Trait Very round compact body with a slight hunch, no dorsal fin, wide-spread double tail with a hood or growth covering the head
Care Level Hard
Ideal Diet Best fed a diet of commercial goldfish pellets that float since these fish don’t swim well, supplemented with live/frozen foods such as bloodworms or brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic only. The nacreous form is a separate breed (Edonishiki)
Pattern Bi-colored is preferred but self-colored fish are available
Colors Red and White or Gold and White are preferred. Also comes in white, black and red/yellow forms
Average Size 1 to 2 inches for juveniles; 5 to 8 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 15 to 20 gallons for adult

Add 10 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds No
Temperature Range 65 to 78°F; best to maintain temperature with a heater
Compatibility with Tank Mates Should only be housed with other delicate fancy goldfish like Lionheads, Celestial or Bubble Eyes

Lionhead Goldfish

It is the most well-known breed of goldfish with no dorsal fins is the gorgeous Lionhead. These beautiful fancy fish appear like the Ranchu however they have a broader back and the traditional double tail.

They typically have a noticeable hood that covers the entire face and head however, this feature is often limited only to the crown of their heads or completely absent.

The lack of a dorsal fin is what causes them to be difficult swimmers, and they perform best in warm aquariums and when they are kept in a tank in a group with other delicate breeds of goldfish.


Lionchu Goldfish

If the name of this goldfish suggests that it’s Ranchu and a Lionhead You’re right! This goldfish is not actually distinct breeds, but instead an amalgamation of both.

Their body structure is similar to that of the Ranchu however they do have the head and fantail that is typical of the Lionhead. The care requirements for them are similar but.

Breed Lionhead Goldfish and Lionchu Goldfish (Lionhead hybrid)
Unique Trait Round compact body, no dorsal fin, classic double tail with a hood or growth covering the head

Lionchu hybrid has a body like a Ranchu with the head and fantail of a Lionhead

Care Level Hard
Ideal Diet Best fed a diet of commercial goldfish pellets that float since these fish don’t swim well, supplemented with live/frozen foods such as bloodworms or brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic or nacreous
Pattern Self-colored, bi-colored, tri-colored or calico
Colors Red, orange, chocolate, black, blue, calico, Red and White or Black and White
Average Size 1 to 2 inches for juveniles; 5 to 8 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 15 to 20 gallons for adult

Add 10 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds No
Temperature Range 65 to 78°F; best to maintain temperature with a heater
Compatibility with Tank Mates Should only be housed with other delicate fancy goldfish like Ranchu, Celestial or Bubble Eyes

Oranda Goldfish

Although this fish is frequently confused with it being a Lionhead however, you can easily identify the differences between the two species by looking at Dorsal Fin. If it’s got one you can tell it’s an Oranda.

The popular goldfish typically feature a large hood on their face or head, and a circular head and tail are the common fancy.

The Oranda comes in a vast range of color morphs, and is frequently mixed with other varieties to produce new breeds.

The color morph with a red cap is the most well-known and is the one that most people envision when they imagine an Oranda however, a variety of newer designs, such as a light silver/blue, are being created.

Breed Oranda Goldfish, Tigerhead or Tiger Goldfish
Unique Trait The round compact body often with a slight hutch, classic double tail with a hood or growth covering the head
Care Level Moderate to Hard
Ideal Diet Best fed a diet of commercial goldfish pellets that float since these fish don’t swim well, supplemented with live/frozen foods such as bloodworms or brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic, matte or nacreous. The nacreous form is sometimes listed as a separate breed but this varies
Pattern Self-colored, bi-colored or calico most common. Red capped Oranda are the most popular and in-demand morph
Colors Red, chocolate, black, blue, calico or Red and White are the most common colors but many others may be available
Average Size 2 to 4 inches for juveniles; 7 to 9 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 15 to 20 gallons for adult

Add 10 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds No
Temperature Range 68 to 78°F; best to maintain temperature with a heater
Compatibility with Tank Mates Should only be housed with other delicate fancy goldfish like Ranchu, Lionhead, Celestial or Bubble Eyes

Telescope Goldfish

If you are looking for an aquarium that has a comical bulge-eye-like appearance Then one of the kinds of Telescope goldfish might be the best choice to fill your aquarium.

They look identical to Fantails however they are a bit smaller. The distinctive features are the eyes that look like they emerge from their heads!

Some fish only possess a mild variant of this characteristic, and their eyes appear to be dome-shaped however they aren’t truly Telescopic. For example, the Black Moor below is an illustration.

Other eyes are bulging significantly or extend far from their faces. The Celestial is a more extreme form of the Telescope goldfish.


Dragon Eye Goldfish

If an Telescope goldfish is a particular cone-shaped fish, it has eyes that stand out from their bodies, they’re commonly referred to as Dragon Eye goldfish.

It’s believed to be the first form of the game in China However, it’s also believed that the Japanese have also developed a variety of variations that have become well-known across the US.


Black, Red and Panda Moor Goldfish

The juvenile goldfish that is caught on an telescopic line is most likely to be classified in the classification of a Black Moor.

This isn’t a stable color change, as a lot (but certainly not every) species of fish shed their melanophores as they age.

The Black Moor most commonly fades into the bi-colored Black and White or Panda form.

Sometimes these fish have an under-lying red/orange color. As the black fades, they transform into an Red and Black colored fish , commonly referred to in the Red Panda!

If they stop all melanophores, they’re known as Red Moor. Red Moor.

They are generally healthier than other telescopic fish , and may be kept in a pond, or in an unheated aquarium.

Breed Telescope Goldfish, Dragon Eye Goldfish

Black, Red and Panda Moors

Unique Trait Egg-shaped body with the classic double tail and eyes which stick out from their heads. Dragon eye variety usually has much more cone-shaped eye protuberances that stick out further.

The Black/Red/Panda Moor are identical to the other types but are distinguished by their mature color morph

Care Level Moderate to Hard
Ideal Diet Best fed a diet of commercial goldfish pellets that float since these fish don’t swim well, supplemented with live/frozen foods such as bloodworms or brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic and nacreous
Pattern Self-colored, bi-colored, tri-colored or calico

Black Moors are self-colored but may fade into red or bi-colored Panda morph upon maturity

Colors Red, chocolate, blue, white, calico, White and Red

Moors are black and may fade to a red, Black and White or Black and Red morph

Average Size 2 to 4 inches for juveniles; 7 to 9 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 15 to 20 gallons for adult

Add 10 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds No for Telescope and Dragon Eye, but some Black Moors are hearty enough for pond life
Temperature Range 68 to 78°F; best to maintain temperature with a heater

Moors can handle 60 to 78°F

Compatibility with Tank Mates Should only be housed with other delicate fancy goldfish like Ranchu, Lionhead, Celestial or Bubble Eyes

Pearlscale Goldfish

If you’re looking for fish that are unique, then you should check out this Pearlscale goldfish! This species has the characteristic of nacreous and is typically colored with calico.

This breed is an one exception, but it is available in bi-colored and self varieties! These are usually calicos, however Red and white variations are not uncommon.

Their stunning scales are adorned with large amounts of calcium within them. This makes every scale shine on the body of your fish.

They appear to have been coated with tiny pearls! The only type of goldfish that has these distinctive and distinct scales.

Breed Pearlscale Goldfish
Unique Trait Round, compact ping pong ball-like body, classic double tail. May have other fancy traits like a hood or telescope eyes. The nacreous scales with heavy calcium deposits is what distinguishes this from other breeds
Care Level Moderate
Ideal Diet Best fed a diet of commercial goldfish pellets that float since these fish don’t swim well, supplemented with live/frozen foods such as bloodworms or brine shrimp
Scale Type Nacreous with large calcium deposits that make each scale stand out on the body and look like little pearls
Pattern Self-colored, bi-colored or calico
Colors Red, white, chocolate, black, blue, calico or Red and White are the most common
Average Size 1 to 2 inches for juveniles; 4 to 6 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 15 to 20 gallons for adult

Add 10 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds No
Temperature Range 65 to 72°F; best to maintain temperature with a heater
Compatibility with Tank Mates Should only be housed with other delicate fancy goldfish like Ranchu, Lionhead, Celestial or Bubble Eyes

Pompom Goldfish

As I wrote in the section on morphology, numerous goldfish species have nasal appendages on their face.

The most common pompom features an egg-shaped fancy body with a double tail, but no dorsal fin or prominent Narial growths both sides of its face.

Pompoms can also be outfitted with attractive features, such as the telescope eye or hood.

Pompoms are often crossbred by Oranda, Bubble Eye, and Fantails to develop new forms. This has led to Pompoms that have dorsal fins.

Most Pompoms are delicate, and their additional facial tissue can put their face at risk to injury or infections.

Breed Pompom Goldfish (Pompon in Japan)
Unique Trait Compact egg-shaped body, no dorsal fin, classic double tail, two pom pom growths which may hang or float over the head. May have other fancy traits like a hood, telescope or bubble eyes

Some varieties, such as the Fantail Pompom, may inherit a dorsal fin but this breed typically doesn’t have them

Care Level Hard
Ideal Diet Best fed a diet of commercial goldfish pellets that float since these fish don’t swim well, supplemented with live/frozen foods such as bloodworms or brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic is most common and nacreous is rare
Pattern Self-colored, bi-colored or tri-colored most common but calico morphs may be available
Colors Red, white/silver, black, calico or Red and White are the most common
Average Size 1 to 2 inches for juveniles; 4 to 6 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 15 to 20 gallons for adult

Add 10 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds No
Temperature Range 68 to 78°F; best to maintain temperature with a heater
Compatibility with Tank Mates Should only be housed with other delicate fancy goldfish like Ranchu, Lionhead, Celestial or Bubble Eyes

Bubble Eye Goldfish

A most intriguing exotic goldfish breeds is called the Bubble Eye. They have huge water-filled bags of flesh that extend from beneath their eyes.

As your fish grows, the bubbles grow larger and they can block their vision!

These awkward swimmers are delicate and are among the most difficult goldfish species to take care of.

It is believed that the Bubble Eyes are usually missing their dorsal fins, making it challenging to move around the tank.

Bubbles can be damaged by decorations and filters in aquariums and decorations, which is why you’ll require an open and secure tank layout to keep them well.

Breed Bubble Eye Goldfish
Unique Trait Compact egg-shaped body, no dorsal fin, classic double tail, prominent fluid-filled bubble sacks under each eye. May have other fancy traits like a hood, telescope eyes and long tail
Care Level Hard
Ideal Diet Best fed a diet of commercial goldfish pellets that float since these fish don’t swim well, supplemented with live/frozen foods such as bloodworms or brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic or nacreous
Pattern Self-colored, bi-colored or calico
Colors Red, black, chocolate, blue, calico or Red and White/Red and Black
Average Size 1 to 2 inches for juveniles; 4 to 6 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 15 to 20 gallons for adult

Add 10 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds No
Temperature Range 68 to 78°F; best to maintain temperature with a heater
Compatibility with Tank Mates Should only be housed with other delicate fancy goldfish like Ranchu, Lionhead, Celestial or other Bubble Eyes

Celestial Eye or Stargazing Goldfish

The most difficult fancy goldfish to care for can be the Celestial Eye. This fish is best kept by skilled aquarists.

They are characterized by a elegant body with a double tail. There is without a dorsal fin or prominent eyes that are telescopic.

Their eyes are upwards towards the uppermost part in their tank. This makes them extremely sensitive to light!

Celestials require an aquarium which isn’t too bright and certainly need their light turned off at night, so they can go to sleep.

They are also more sensitive to health than some breeds, and are more susceptible to a variety of health issues.

Breed Celestial Eye Goldfish, Stargazing Goldfish
Unique Trait Compact egg-shaped body, no dorsal fin, classic double tail, telescopic upturned eyes. May have other fancy traits like a hood, pompoms or a long tail
Care Level Very Hard
Ideal Diet Best fed a diet of commercial goldfish pellets that float since these fish don’t swim well, supplemented with live/frozen foods such as bloodworms or brine shrimp
Scale Type Metallic or nacreous
Pattern Self-colored or calico
Colors Red/orange, black and calico
Average Size 1 to 2 inches for juveniles; 4 to 6 inches in length at maturity
Minimum Tank Size 10 gallons for juvenile; 15 to 20 gallons for adult

Add 10 gallons per adult

Ok for Ponds No
Temperature Range 68 to 78°F; best to maintain temperature with a heater
Compatibility with Tank Mates Should only be housed with other delicate fancy goldfish like Ranchu, Lionhead, Pompom or Bubble Eyes

Rare Breeds of Fancy Goldfish

I was unable to get much information on the various goldfish species because many of them are only raised in Asia and aren’t sold in aquarium stores.

If you’ve encountered or owned one of these breeds that are rare I’d love to learn about your experiences!

Izumo Nankin

This unique Japanese breed is seldom found in west. It is known as the Izumo Nankin is a top-viewed bi-colored Red and white dorsal-less goldfish that has the tail being partially fused in the Ranchu style.


Curled-Gill Goldfish

Curled gills are a genetic mutation which causes the gill covers to stretch out and away from gills, making them visible. rendering them obvious. It’s a bad condition and breeders remove it from their breeds.

If you spot this kind of fish in an aquarium store, it is recommended not to purchase the fish as they’re likely to be unhealthful.


Eggfish, Egg-Fish or Maruko Goldfish

The thought of being the ancestor of the dorsal-less line eggs, goldfish also known as Maruko isn’t currently available for purchase.

A few goldfish enthusiasts have been working to revive the lineage from Ranchu stock, however their offspring haven’t made it to the commercial market until now.


Siamese Doll Goldfish

It is believed that the Siamese Doll is a rare species of Fantail with an distinctive yellow hue. It is often referred to as the Lutino morph. I’ve never seen this sort of goldfish available for purchase, however they are more likely to be found in other countries.


Jade Seal Goldfish

The Jade Seal is an older breed of goldfish that is not currently available. They are basically a Red Oranda with a White Cap.

Conclusion

It may seem daunting to have such a lengthy selection of options to choose fish to be the goldfish’s habitat.

Fortunately, despite the vast range of colors and exotic characteristics, goldfish can be easily separated according to the requirements for their care.

I hope this thorough information on goldfish breeding provided you with the ideal match!

Choosing a goldfish starts by deciding if you’re stocking a pond or aquarium:

  • Single tail fish is ideal for ponds, however certain fancy species such as Jikin, the Butterfly, Jikin and Ryukin can be found in ponds as well.
  • Any of the goldfish that are on my list is a good choice for a 30 to 50-gallon tank. Some are ideal for beginning aquarists while others are great even for experienced keepers of fish.

We’d like to hear about any breeds of goldfish that you’ve caught in the comments section, or join us on social media. Let me know if there is any experiences with rare varieties of Asian goldfish such as Izumo! Izumo!

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